Tag Archives: recycling waste

Most Things Can Be Recycled And Kartaway Leads The Way

Australians have become used to recycling, with most now regularly recycling newspapers, bottles, cans and cardboard packaging.  But not everyone realises that most things are able to be recycled. Some rather bizarre items are being recycled, for example dentures and chewing gum!  A not for profit organisation in Japan found a great way to fundraise by reclaiming metals like gold and silver from discarded dentures.  The proceeds are donated to Unicef. An airport in England collects used chewing gum, sending it off for recycling into tyres, toys and other products.  Kartaway are dedicated to diverting waste from landfill, recycling most of the waste they receive.  Their public Recycling Depots in Melbourne and Adelaide will receive and recycle the following waste:

  • green waste
  • metal
  • cardboard
  • timber
  •  batteries
  • electronic waste
  •  dirt
  •  brick
  • concrete
  •  asphalt

Some amazing examples of re-using materials can be found in some of the houses people have built around the world from recycled materials.  A retired upholsterer, John Milkovisch, built a house entirely from beer cans in the U.S. and Édouard T. Arsenault built a house out of 25,000 recycled bottles in Canada.

bottle house

 

Some more conservative structures have been built recently in the Netherlands and Utah, USA entirely from recycled materials.  Two Architects from the Netherlands set about building their home from materials discovered in the area, they found recycled steel from an old textile mill which they used for the framework and some old cable reels provided the wood to complete the façade. In Utah a surprisingly modern and gorgeous home has been constructed from two disused silos.

silo house

To recycle your items look no further than Kartaway, call 1300 362 362  to order a skip or bin or visit their Recycling Depots.

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Recycling Rates Break New Records In Australia

Recycling rates in Australia have broken new records. A report has shown that 64.2% of post-consumer packaging has been recycled in 2013, a big improvement from the baseline of 39% established in 2003.  In the 2013 Annual Report by the Australian Packaging Covenant, a voluntary organisation committed to reducing the environmental impacts of packaging, it was found that the recycling rate for recovered fibre packaging has also increased to a new record high of 78%.  Glass is the most improved performer when it comes to recycling, with a massive increase to 128% in recycling tonnes since 2003.  Plastics are recycled at the rate of 73% and paper/cardboard at 70%.

Commenting on the data, Vanio Calgaro, General Manager, APC, said: “The positive data coming from the report is further evidence that the current approach to increasing recycling and reducing litter is working. These results show that Australians are doing the right thing and that recycling has become a way of life. We hope to build on this great work in working towards our target of a 70% recycling rate by 2015”. Bringing government, industry and community groups together to find ways to address packaging sustainability issues, the Australian Packaging Covenant (APC) has worked tirelessly to reduce litter, increase recycling and encourage business to design more sustainable packaging.

Kartaway support all recycling efforts in business and the community.  Supplying skips and bins to the public and corporations, Kartaway maintain a policy of recycling waste collected, wherever a facility exists to re-use or reycle the material.  They also operate public Recycling Depots in Campbelltown, Adelaide and East Brunswick, Melbourne.

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Recycling In Australia Has Come A Long Way

Kartaway are a leading company recycling waste in Australia and are a part of its recycling history.  Householders, through necessity, re-used and recycled many items in the early days but recycling on a larger scale began later. As early as 1815 one Australian paper mill used recycled rags to make paper. Waste paper collections were the earliest organised recycling programs, beginning in Melbourne in the 1920s and spread to other cities in the 1940s; cart and horse collections of newspapers from households became common.

Another recycling industry established in earlier times was metals, with Henry Ford recycling his Model T Fords in the 1920s and BHP Steel recycling industrial steel scrap in 1915. Scrap metal dealers recovered and re-sold valuable metals. It was during this era that Paul Joseph Whelan’s demolition business began selling second hand building material from the sites.  His company, Whelan The Wrecker, became famous in Melbourne and was the fore-runner to Kartaway.

During the mid 20th century glass bottles had a return deposit on them and were re-used by the manufacturers, popular with children to gain extra pocket money and scouting groups for fund raising. Over 20 years ago Comalco set up a ‘cash for cans’ program with buy-back centres where children and community groups could return cans for cash.

Canterbury Council began using magnetic separation to recover steel waste, including cans in 1975 and in 1977 South Australia introduced container deposit legislation, encouraging the return of beverage containers for recycling.

The need for extensive recycling was finally recognised in the late 80’s and early 90’s when councils introduced kerbside recycling schemes. Households could now separate out common items such as paper, glass and aluminium, and later PET, HDPE milk containers, liquidpaperboard milk and juice cartons and steel cans. In 1997 Kartaway opened the first public Recycling Depot at 32 Kirkdale Rd, East Brunswick.  The Depot is able to accept green waste, metal, cardboard, timber, batteries, electronic waste, dirt, brick, concrete and asphalt, diverting these items from landfill.

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The Keen Recycler Bids For The New York Times

Chinese millionaire Chen Guangbiao built his fortune through his recycling company, Huangpu Renewable Resources Utilization Group. At the same time, he has boosted his reputation in China with publicity stunts based on philanthropic acts or focussed on environmental messages, such as selling “canned air” in Beijing to raise awareness about ecological issues. He and his wife changed their names to Low Carbon and Green.

Chen began as an entrepreneur at an early age selling clean water to a nearby village, he went on to run several businesses before attending university. He became involved in the demolition of an old stadium in Nanjing.  Coming up with the idea of selling the used iron, he hoped to make a profit as he was not being paid for the demolition.  It turns out he had the right idea, he made a profit of $272,000!

He then established a recycling company, selling iron to iron and steel companies and recycling cement blocks back into concrete (by mixing with water, cement and sand).  He found that all the construction waste could be transformed into at least seven types of building materials, such as landfill, red brick and building blocks. China produces 2 billion tons of construction waste, creating a rich market for recycling.

Kartaway in Australia came about from slightly different beginnings, with James Paul Whelan starting up a cartage company in 1892, gradually moving into demolition and sale of the second hand materials from the sites, and the famous Whelan The Wrecker was born. After a period of acquisition and growth the company became Kartaway and now run public recycling depots in Melbourne and Adelaide. Hiring bins and skips to the public and customising waste management programs for businesses and organisations the business focusses strongly on the recycling of most materials.

Chen Guangbiao has been in the world news recently as he makes a bid for a sizeable share in the New York Times.  The Whelan family will probably not follow suite on Chen’s latest venture!

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Waste Management Experts, Kartaway, Add Junior Rear Lift Truck to Melbourne Fleet

Kartaway recently announced the addition of the Hino 300 series truck, capable of servicing most medium to high density dwellings, to its Melbourne fleet.

With a rise in medium to high density housing within inner Metropolitan Melbourne providers of waste management services have run into difficulties providing effective waste collection services.  Unable to access the bin rooms/areas due to restricted access and underground car parks many Waste Management Providers could only offer a reduced level of service. In order to guarantee a continuation of service quality to their Melbourne customers, Kartaway have introduced the newest member of its fleet, a new Hino 300 series truck, which has been affectionately dubbed “Junior”.

Mark Whelan, Director of National Operations at Kartaway said  “It was evident that we needed a solution to allow us to continue delivering the best and most efficient possible service to our Melbourne customers. Having noted the Australian Bureau of Statistics findings that in 2010-2011 medium to high density dwellings accounted for over 90% of new building approvals in Inner Melbourne alone, and over 30% of Greater Metropolitan Melbourne we knew we had to act.”

Junior has a greatly reduced turning circle and, due to its dimensions, is able to service most underground car  parks*.  As well as accessibility to bin rooms in tight areas, Junior also offers a number of benefits including a reduction in excessive street noise caused by curb-side tipping and improved curb appeal, as bins can be collected from underground car parks rather than curbs.

Kartaway has operated for over 120 years and is a leader in the Waste Management and Recycling Industry. The company services Commercial, Residential and Constructions sectors through its Open Top and Rear Lift bin divisions. Call 1300 132 132 to talk about Junior with an Account Manager.

* For underground car parks with a maximum entry height of 2.05 metres.

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Tyre Stockpiling Fire Linked to Accused Murderer

Another fire caused by tyre stockpiling is linked to an accused murderer, Ron Medich.  The Sydney Morning Herald reported on November 18th that the fire almost gutted a tyre dump in Sydney’s west and the company Carbon Polymers, part owned by Ron Medich, faces expulsion from the site. In New South Wales alone there have been 256 blazes over the past five years linked to tyres.

The issue of fires caused by tyres has concerned industry associations and the recent removal of tyre storage from Queensland’s Department of Environment Environmentally Relevant Activities (ERAs) in the Environmental Protection Regulation has been further cause for concern.  The Environment Protection Authority is working with environment group Boomerang Alliance to reduce the number of toxic fires involving tyres.

Kartaway collect used tyres in Melbourne, Adelaide, Queensland and ensure that the tyres are then sent to bona fide recyclers. Unfortunately, a criminal element has crept into the market, offering cheap disposal of tyres.  The unsuspecting customer is told the tyres are being stored temporarily but the used tyres are being stored in facilities not purpose built to offset the risk of long lasting “oil fires” generated by waste tyres. Unfortunately, most of these rogue operators do not recycle or dispose of the tyres responsibly and stockpiling has re-emerged.  When disposing of tyres customers should be asking how and where the tyres are being disposed of.  Kartaway customers can rest assured their tyres will be safely recycled.   CEO of the Australian Council of Recycling, Grant Musgrove in his submission to the Department of Environment has stated “It is important that regulations are in place to ensure operators that charge customers to collect tyres for recycling do actually recycle or dispose of the tyres without negative impacts on the environment and to human health.” He advises that the environmental costs of these fires is high – waterways, soil and the air are all affected adversely, also posing a risk to human health.

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Kartaway Introduces Front Lift Factory Bins to Australia

Kartaway proudly announces the introduction of the durable front lift
factory bin to its large range of bins. The factory bins are available in three sizes:

  •  1.5m3
  •  3.0m3
  •  4.5m3

The range has been designed to suit small factories with the 1.5m3 bin and larger factories with the 3.0m3 or 4.5m3 bins, depending on the amount of waste being collected.  The bins can be fitted with castors for easy manoeuvrability around the factory and all are fitted with plastic lids and locks for security, ensuring only authorised personnel can fill the bins. Ideal for off cuts, plastics, strapping, timber and food waste the factory bins are highly versatile and the front loader allows for easy pick up and drop off, particularly in tight spaces.

 As leaders in waste management services Kartaway offer efficient service, reasonable pricing and excellent customer service, as well as 30 day credit terms and a dedicated Account Manager to all account customers.  A Kartaway Account Manager will benefit your organisation by developing an efficient waste management program. Pick ups and deliveries will be timed to suit your business operations, scheduled to a daily, weekl y or  fortnightly cycle.  Kartaway do not have hidden costs and are leaders in recycling. http://www.kartaway.com.au/index.html

With their own public Recycling Depots  located in Brunwick East, Melbourne and Campbelltown, Adelaide Kartaway are dedicated to diverting as much waste as possible from landfill. Recycling paper and cardboard, fluorescent tubes, green waste, liquid waste, metal, pallets and computers as well as many other items the Depots are open 7 days a week.

Call Kartaway on 1300 362 362 to discuss your organisation’s waste program with an experienced, dedicated Account Manager.

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