Tag Archives: recycling rubbish

Most Things Can Be Recycled And Kartaway Leads The Way

Australians have become used to recycling, with most now regularly recycling newspapers, bottles, cans and cardboard packaging.  But not everyone realises that most things are able to be recycled. Some rather bizarre items are being recycled, for example dentures and chewing gum!  A not for profit organisation in Japan found a great way to fundraise by reclaiming metals like gold and silver from discarded dentures.  The proceeds are donated to Unicef. An airport in England collects used chewing gum, sending it off for recycling into tyres, toys and other products.  Kartaway are dedicated to diverting waste from landfill, recycling most of the waste they receive.  Their public Recycling Depots in Melbourne and Adelaide will receive and recycle the following waste:

  • green waste
  • metal
  • cardboard
  • timber
  •  batteries
  • electronic waste
  •  dirt
  •  brick
  • concrete
  •  asphalt

Some amazing examples of re-using materials can be found in some of the houses people have built around the world from recycled materials.  A retired upholsterer, John Milkovisch, built a house entirely from beer cans in the U.S. and Édouard T. Arsenault built a house out of 25,000 recycled bottles in Canada.

bottle house

 

Some more conservative structures have been built recently in the Netherlands and Utah, USA entirely from recycled materials.  Two Architects from the Netherlands set about building their home from materials discovered in the area, they found recycled steel from an old textile mill which they used for the framework and some old cable reels provided the wood to complete the façade. In Utah a surprisingly modern and gorgeous home has been constructed from two disused silos.

silo house

To recycle your items look no further than Kartaway, call 1300 362 362  to order a skip or bin or visit their Recycling Depots.

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Kartaway Commend Recycling Efforts’ Environmental Gains

Australians now see recycling as a way of life, committing to high levels of recycling. It is even more motivating when people understand how much energy is saved through their recycling efforts and the actual impacts upon the environment.  Using recycled plastic to produce plastic products saves approximately 88% of energy compared to producing plastic from the raw materials of oil and gas. And what do they produce?

  • garden edging
  • sign posts
  • compost bins
  • speed humps
  • plant pots
  • picnic tables and park benches
  • carpet fibre clothing
  • automotive parts
  • paint brushes
  • plastic bottles

Using recycled glass to make more glass products saves 30% of energy. 1 tonne of recycled glass saves 1.1 tonnes of the raw materials sand, limestone and soda ash. Glass is 100% recyclable and can be recycled over and over again indefinitely, even millions of times. Refillable glass bottles are great savers of energy, using 19,000 BTUs of energy, compared to 38,000 BTUs for throwaway bottles. I recycled glass bottle saves enough energy to power four hours of an 100 watt electric light. Making aluminium cans from recycled aluminium saves a massive 95% of energy. One recycled aluminium can saves enough energy to power a TV for three hours or light a 100 watt bulb for 3.5 hours. As well as cans, aluminium is also recycled into aeroplanes and cars. Recycling steel makes some significant environmental savings, such as 74% savings in energy, 86% reduction in air pollution, 90% savings in virgin materials, 40% reduction in water use, 76% reduction in water pollution and 97% reduction in mining wastes. And what are steel cans and steel scrap made into?

  • structural steel
  • bolts and nuts
  • coat hangers
  • steel cans

Kartaway support these recycling efforts and run two public Recycling Depots in Australia, one in Melbourne and one in Adelaide.

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Recycling Rates Break New Records In Australia

Recycling rates in Australia have broken new records. A report has shown that 64.2% of post-consumer packaging has been recycled in 2013, a big improvement from the baseline of 39% established in 2003.  In the 2013 Annual Report by the Australian Packaging Covenant, a voluntary organisation committed to reducing the environmental impacts of packaging, it was found that the recycling rate for recovered fibre packaging has also increased to a new record high of 78%.  Glass is the most improved performer when it comes to recycling, with a massive increase to 128% in recycling tonnes since 2003.  Plastics are recycled at the rate of 73% and paper/cardboard at 70%.

Commenting on the data, Vanio Calgaro, General Manager, APC, said: “The positive data coming from the report is further evidence that the current approach to increasing recycling and reducing litter is working. These results show that Australians are doing the right thing and that recycling has become a way of life. We hope to build on this great work in working towards our target of a 70% recycling rate by 2015”. Bringing government, industry and community groups together to find ways to address packaging sustainability issues, the Australian Packaging Covenant (APC) has worked tirelessly to reduce litter, increase recycling and encourage business to design more sustainable packaging.

Kartaway support all recycling efforts in business and the community.  Supplying skips and bins to the public and corporations, Kartaway maintain a policy of recycling waste collected, wherever a facility exists to re-use or reycle the material.  They also operate public Recycling Depots in Campbelltown, Adelaide and East Brunswick, Melbourne.

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Recycling In Australia Has Come A Long Way

Kartaway are a leading company recycling waste in Australia and are a part of its recycling history.  Householders, through necessity, re-used and recycled many items in the early days but recycling on a larger scale began later. As early as 1815 one Australian paper mill used recycled rags to make paper. Waste paper collections were the earliest organised recycling programs, beginning in Melbourne in the 1920s and spread to other cities in the 1940s; cart and horse collections of newspapers from households became common.

Another recycling industry established in earlier times was metals, with Henry Ford recycling his Model T Fords in the 1920s and BHP Steel recycling industrial steel scrap in 1915. Scrap metal dealers recovered and re-sold valuable metals. It was during this era that Paul Joseph Whelan’s demolition business began selling second hand building material from the sites.  His company, Whelan The Wrecker, became famous in Melbourne and was the fore-runner to Kartaway.

During the mid 20th century glass bottles had a return deposit on them and were re-used by the manufacturers, popular with children to gain extra pocket money and scouting groups for fund raising. Over 20 years ago Comalco set up a ‘cash for cans’ program with buy-back centres where children and community groups could return cans for cash.

Canterbury Council began using magnetic separation to recover steel waste, including cans in 1975 and in 1977 South Australia introduced container deposit legislation, encouraging the return of beverage containers for recycling.

The need for extensive recycling was finally recognised in the late 80’s and early 90’s when councils introduced kerbside recycling schemes. Households could now separate out common items such as paper, glass and aluminium, and later PET, HDPE milk containers, liquidpaperboard milk and juice cartons and steel cans. In 1997 Kartaway opened the first public Recycling Depot at 32 Kirkdale Rd, East Brunswick.  The Depot is able to accept green waste, metal, cardboard, timber, batteries, electronic waste, dirt, brick, concrete and asphalt, diverting these items from landfill.

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The Keen Recycler Bids For The New York Times

Chinese millionaire Chen Guangbiao built his fortune through his recycling company, Huangpu Renewable Resources Utilization Group. At the same time, he has boosted his reputation in China with publicity stunts based on philanthropic acts or focussed on environmental messages, such as selling “canned air” in Beijing to raise awareness about ecological issues. He and his wife changed their names to Low Carbon and Green.

Chen began as an entrepreneur at an early age selling clean water to a nearby village, he went on to run several businesses before attending university. He became involved in the demolition of an old stadium in Nanjing.  Coming up with the idea of selling the used iron, he hoped to make a profit as he was not being paid for the demolition.  It turns out he had the right idea, he made a profit of $272,000!

He then established a recycling company, selling iron to iron and steel companies and recycling cement blocks back into concrete (by mixing with water, cement and sand).  He found that all the construction waste could be transformed into at least seven types of building materials, such as landfill, red brick and building blocks. China produces 2 billion tons of construction waste, creating a rich market for recycling.

Kartaway in Australia came about from slightly different beginnings, with James Paul Whelan starting up a cartage company in 1892, gradually moving into demolition and sale of the second hand materials from the sites, and the famous Whelan The Wrecker was born. After a period of acquisition and growth the company became Kartaway and now run public recycling depots in Melbourne and Adelaide. Hiring bins and skips to the public and customising waste management programs for businesses and organisations the business focusses strongly on the recycling of most materials.

Chen Guangbiao has been in the world news recently as he makes a bid for a sizeable share in the New York Times.  The Whelan family will probably not follow suite on Chen’s latest venture!

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Waste Management Company Provides Excellent Service to Newly Confident Builders

With the federal election over Australian businesses are more confident. Master builders are looking to an upturn in building and the small to medium builders are ready to go. With the help of the First Home Owners Grant available for building or purchasing a brand new home,designed to  stimulate building, and the current low interest rates building is bound to increase.

Building sites require management of the waste generated. Builders look to an efficient, reliable and flexible waste management company to make their job that much easier. A rubbish removal service that can be scheduled to do pick-ups and drop-offs to fit in with the builder’s timetable, sort waste and recycle most waste collected is a definite plus for any building site.  A company that can also manage multi sites for a builder is even better.  Kartaway is one such company.

Operating in most states of Australia, Kartaway provides an efficient waste management service to builders, businesses, factories, body corporate and shopping centres.  The Canberra Branch have recently added Googong, Jacka, Moncrief and Tralee to the many suburbs they service with excellent rubbish removal, recycling and full waste management programs. Also servicing regional areas, the Canberra Branch can deliver skips and bins to   –

  •   Bungendore
  •   Royalla
  •   Murrumbateman
  •   Sutton / Gundaroo
  •   Wamboin

Ready to provide a range of services from a small skip for a home clean up to large walk in bins for large building sites and full waste management plans for factories and shopping centres you can rely on Kartaway. Their pricing is competitive and their customer service is excellent.  Call to discuss your waste management needs with an Account Manager on 1300 362 362.

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Imagine Using a Pin Number To Remove Waste

The City of Sydney are seriously considering using PIN numbers for rubbish disposal for residents in a cluttered cul-de-sac in Royston Street, Darlinghurst. The situation has become so bad that a novel approach to rubbish removal and recycling was urgently needed. The City of Sydney came up with a unique idea – chutes leading down to an underground collection point. Five 1100 litre bins for general waste and recycling would be at the end of the chutes and a scissor lift would be used to bring the bins up to street level for collection. Residents would use PINs to access the chutes.

According to a report in the Sydney Morning Herald this is included in the City of Sydney Draft Waste Policy and came about because the street had become an eyesore. Lacking space in the front of the older style apartment buildings to store their wheelie bins the residents had taken to leaving them in the middle of the traffic island in the centre of the cul-de-sac. Then came recycling bins, adding to the clutter, then illegal dumpers began to leave their rubbish, along came the rats and cockroaches and the whole situation was out of control. The project is estimated to cost $85,000

Kartaway has solved similar problems for their corporate customers.  In Melbourne and Sydney Kartaway Account Managers have developed customised waste management programs to overcome challenging situations.  One example was at a multi-level corporate building in the heart of Melbourne. With wheelie bins cluttering the loading dock deliveries to the building were being compromised.  The solution Kartaway were able to offer was to install two of their CP50 compactor units, one for general waste and one for cardboard recycling.
Kartaway Compactor Unit from rear  As the units only require a small amount of space they were able to be located in another area that had been underutilised.  The compactor units compact the waste down resulting in a more efficient waste management program with fewer pick-ups required than for wheelie bins.  The loading dock was now freed up for it’s original purpose, the building’s deliveries.

Kartaway are able to customise novel waste management solutions to suit organisations’ unique situations. Call 1300 362 362 to speak to an Account Manager about a customised waste management program to suit your waste needs.

SMH article at : http://www.smh.com.au/environment/pinprotected-bins-how-city-will-clean-up-eyesore-20130721-2qch7.html#ixzz2ZkDOr0YP

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