Tag Archives: recycling of waste

Kartaway Commend Recycling Efforts’ Environmental Gains

Australians now see recycling as a way of life, committing to high levels of recycling. It is even more motivating when people understand how much energy is saved through their recycling efforts and the actual impacts upon the environment.  Using recycled plastic to produce plastic products saves approximately 88% of energy compared to producing plastic from the raw materials of oil and gas. And what do they produce?

  • garden edging
  • sign posts
  • compost bins
  • speed humps
  • plant pots
  • picnic tables and park benches
  • carpet fibre clothing
  • automotive parts
  • paint brushes
  • plastic bottles

Using recycled glass to make more glass products saves 30% of energy. 1 tonne of recycled glass saves 1.1 tonnes of the raw materials sand, limestone and soda ash. Glass is 100% recyclable and can be recycled over and over again indefinitely, even millions of times. Refillable glass bottles are great savers of energy, using 19,000 BTUs of energy, compared to 38,000 BTUs for throwaway bottles. I recycled glass bottle saves enough energy to power four hours of an 100 watt electric light. Making aluminium cans from recycled aluminium saves a massive 95% of energy. One recycled aluminium can saves enough energy to power a TV for three hours or light a 100 watt bulb for 3.5 hours. As well as cans, aluminium is also recycled into aeroplanes and cars. Recycling steel makes some significant environmental savings, such as 74% savings in energy, 86% reduction in air pollution, 90% savings in virgin materials, 40% reduction in water use, 76% reduction in water pollution and 97% reduction in mining wastes. And what are steel cans and steel scrap made into?

  • structural steel
  • bolts and nuts
  • coat hangers
  • steel cans

Kartaway support these recycling efforts and run two public Recycling Depots in Australia, one in Melbourne and one in Adelaide.

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Recycling Rates Break New Records In Australia

Recycling rates in Australia have broken new records. A report has shown that 64.2% of post-consumer packaging has been recycled in 2013, a big improvement from the baseline of 39% established in 2003.  In the 2013 Annual Report by the Australian Packaging Covenant, a voluntary organisation committed to reducing the environmental impacts of packaging, it was found that the recycling rate for recovered fibre packaging has also increased to a new record high of 78%.  Glass is the most improved performer when it comes to recycling, with a massive increase to 128% in recycling tonnes since 2003.  Plastics are recycled at the rate of 73% and paper/cardboard at 70%.

Commenting on the data, Vanio Calgaro, General Manager, APC, said: “The positive data coming from the report is further evidence that the current approach to increasing recycling and reducing litter is working. These results show that Australians are doing the right thing and that recycling has become a way of life. We hope to build on this great work in working towards our target of a 70% recycling rate by 2015”. Bringing government, industry and community groups together to find ways to address packaging sustainability issues, the Australian Packaging Covenant (APC) has worked tirelessly to reduce litter, increase recycling and encourage business to design more sustainable packaging.

Kartaway support all recycling efforts in business and the community.  Supplying skips and bins to the public and corporations, Kartaway maintain a policy of recycling waste collected, wherever a facility exists to re-use or reycle the material.  They also operate public Recycling Depots in Campbelltown, Adelaide and East Brunswick, Melbourne.

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Recycling Depots in Melbourne & Adelaide and the Recycling of Plastic

Plastic became very popular in modern life during the 1950s and has become a major material used in manufacturing, building and packaging throughout western civilisation. Since its adoption however, it has become a major contributor to landfill and, as plastic does not break down for hundreds of years, it became a major problem. The recycling of plastics began in earnest during the 1980s.  Government programs, consumer education and the development of industrial processes to transform discarded plastic into useful materials have all contributed to less plastic going to landfill.

The introduction of PETE and HDPE plastics in the 80’s and 90’s transformed the recycling effort.  This type of plastic is able to be recycled and carries the identifiable recyclable logo of three arrows depicting a triangle.

There are more steps required in recycling plastics than in recycling paper, glass and metals. Plastic requires the extraction of dyes, fillers and other additives. The first step in recycling plastic is to sort it by the type of resin used in its structure, of which there are seven basic types, and sometimes it is also sorted by colour. The second step is to chop the plastic into small pieces, then clean it to remove debris and small residue.  It is then melted down and compressed into pellets, these are called nurdles. The nurdles are transported to plastic processing plants and introduced into the manufacturing process.

Kartaway are a leading recycling and waste management company in Australia.  They are able to recycle most waste collected, including plastics.  Providing bins and skips to households, builders, body corporates, shopping complexes, multi storey complexes and educational facilities they sort and recycle collected waste. Kartaway also operate Recycling Depots for the public in Adelaide and Melbourne.

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Recycling In Australia Has Come A Long Way

Kartaway are a leading company recycling waste in Australia and are a part of its recycling history.  Householders, through necessity, re-used and recycled many items in the early days but recycling on a larger scale began later. As early as 1815 one Australian paper mill used recycled rags to make paper. Waste paper collections were the earliest organised recycling programs, beginning in Melbourne in the 1920s and spread to other cities in the 1940s; cart and horse collections of newspapers from households became common.

Another recycling industry established in earlier times was metals, with Henry Ford recycling his Model T Fords in the 1920s and BHP Steel recycling industrial steel scrap in 1915. Scrap metal dealers recovered and re-sold valuable metals. It was during this era that Paul Joseph Whelan’s demolition business began selling second hand building material from the sites.  His company, Whelan The Wrecker, became famous in Melbourne and was the fore-runner to Kartaway.

During the mid 20th century glass bottles had a return deposit on them and were re-used by the manufacturers, popular with children to gain extra pocket money and scouting groups for fund raising. Over 20 years ago Comalco set up a ‘cash for cans’ program with buy-back centres where children and community groups could return cans for cash.

Canterbury Council began using magnetic separation to recover steel waste, including cans in 1975 and in 1977 South Australia introduced container deposit legislation, encouraging the return of beverage containers for recycling.

The need for extensive recycling was finally recognised in the late 80’s and early 90’s when councils introduced kerbside recycling schemes. Households could now separate out common items such as paper, glass and aluminium, and later PET, HDPE milk containers, liquidpaperboard milk and juice cartons and steel cans. In 1997 Kartaway opened the first public Recycling Depot at 32 Kirkdale Rd, East Brunswick.  The Depot is able to accept green waste, metal, cardboard, timber, batteries, electronic waste, dirt, brick, concrete and asphalt, diverting these items from landfill.

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The Keen Recycler Bids For The New York Times

Chinese millionaire Chen Guangbiao built his fortune through his recycling company, Huangpu Renewable Resources Utilization Group. At the same time, he has boosted his reputation in China with publicity stunts based on philanthropic acts or focussed on environmental messages, such as selling “canned air” in Beijing to raise awareness about ecological issues. He and his wife changed their names to Low Carbon and Green.

Chen began as an entrepreneur at an early age selling clean water to a nearby village, he went on to run several businesses before attending university. He became involved in the demolition of an old stadium in Nanjing.  Coming up with the idea of selling the used iron, he hoped to make a profit as he was not being paid for the demolition.  It turns out he had the right idea, he made a profit of $272,000!

He then established a recycling company, selling iron to iron and steel companies and recycling cement blocks back into concrete (by mixing with water, cement and sand).  He found that all the construction waste could be transformed into at least seven types of building materials, such as landfill, red brick and building blocks. China produces 2 billion tons of construction waste, creating a rich market for recycling.

Kartaway in Australia came about from slightly different beginnings, with James Paul Whelan starting up a cartage company in 1892, gradually moving into demolition and sale of the second hand materials from the sites, and the famous Whelan The Wrecker was born. After a period of acquisition and growth the company became Kartaway and now run public recycling depots in Melbourne and Adelaide. Hiring bins and skips to the public and customising waste management programs for businesses and organisations the business focusses strongly on the recycling of most materials.

Chen Guangbiao has been in the world news recently as he makes a bid for a sizeable share in the New York Times.  The Whelan family will probably not follow suite on Chen’s latest venture!

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Transfer Stations and Material Recovery Facilities

A transfer station is a depot that receives and temporarily stores waste in a designated area for minor segregation and/or minor resource recovery prior to their transport to some other approved depot for further sorting, resource recovery or disposal.

Similarly a material recovery facility (MRF) receives, stores and processes waste but with a focus on resource recovery. There will be a transfer component in order to direct the recovered recyclable wastes to a recycling facility and residual waste to disposal.

Both transfer stations and MRFs feed recovered wastes into recycling facilities that usually deal with a single recyclable waste stream to produce a recycled product instead of mixed waste for separation.

A MRF and a transfer station are both classified as a ‘waste or recycling depot’, which is an activity of environmental significance as prescribed by Schedule 1, Part A of the Environmental Protection Act 1993 (the Act), and must be licensed or otherwise authorised under Part 6 of the Act. An environmental authorisation cannot be issued until development approval has been granted. Source: EPA South Australia website.

Kartaway Waste Management operate two public transfer stations, one in Adelaide and one in Melbourne. The Stations are clean, easy accessible and conveniently located with friendly staff that are efficient and helpful . With a strong environmental focus Kartaway recycle most waste, diverting a large proportion from landfill. The Transfer Stations are accessible all weather with undercover bays, fully asphalted and are affordable.
The Adelaide Transfer Station is at Virginia Rd, Newton,Campbelltown and the Melbourne Transfer Station is at Kirkdale Rd, Brunswick. Go to kartaway.com.au for map directions.

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Flexible Commercial Waste Management Solutions

Whether you have a Restaurant, Body Corporate or Shopping Centre waste management is an issue. Kartaway can manage your waste stream effectively and efficiently with a range of wheelie bins and rear lift trucks. Rear lift trucks can deliver and pick up in places where accessibility is limited, and their noise level is greatly reduced. Front lift trucks are used for the larger size wheelie bins.

With a strong commitment to environmentally sound practices Kartaway recycles
most waste collected in wheelie bins. With our own transfer stations dedicated to a high level of recycling with green star certification, we take caring for the environment seriously. By recycling bottles, cardboard, paper, plastics, garden waste, and glass large volumes of waste are diverted away from landfill.

Space Saving Solutions

When the volume of waste outstrips your space, we have the solution – The Kartaway Compactor Unit. We offer a totally managed service, with empty bins replacing full bins at changeover. We do daily to weekly pickups – to suit your requirements. We understand your needs and work closely with you to provide a waste management programme that is efficient, reliable and cost effective with minimum disruption. The CP50 Compactor Unit & Bin dimensions are 4383mmL x 1390mmH. If a larger Compactor Unit is required we can custom design a unit to suit your needs.

We design industry specific programmes for specific waste removal and there are no delays with real time communication and response. We also design customised recycling programmes.

Customised Support

Australian owned and operated and with over 100 year’s experience in the industry we are uniquely positioned to support the maintenance management of body corporates, shopping centres, schools and food courts, to name a few. Our current, late model fleet are radio/GPS controlled to ensure prompt delivery and pick up. The area around your bin is cleaned at pick up and replacement bins are clean and deodorised. Our pickups are timed to suit your operations.

Efficient Loading

We assist you with the most cost effective and practical way to load your waste. Use one of the methods below, or we can design a customised loading system to suit your needs.

Side Lifter
For transfer from 240 litre plastic bins. An hydraulic side lifter automatically lifts and empties each bin

Dock Download
For simple unloading of hand trolleys

Hand Loading
Loose or bagged rubbish can be placed straight into the bin

Chute Feed
For locations with a number of rubbish sources, such as multi-storey buildings

Kartaway are leaders in the waste management industry, we focus on your business needs, the environment and the future. We service Melbourne, Sydney, Adelaide, Brisbane, Canberra, the Gold Coast and the Sunshine Coast. For a complete analysis and expert advice call 1300 362 362 to arrange an onsite visit.

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